WHAT IS METHAMPHETAMINE?

Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive stimulant drug that is made from pseudoephedrine (cold medicine) tablets, water, lithium from batteries, anhydrous ammonia, ammonium nitrate, red phosphorus, lye (sodium hydroxide) and solvents. Common street or drug culture names include: meth, chalk, crank, crystal, glass, ice, up, speed and shards.

Wisconsin’s main source of meth is being trafficked from Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota to northwestern Wisconsin. Generally, meth can be found in the form of pills or a white or cloudy powder, while crystal meth is similar to clear glass shards or shiny blueish white rocks. Law enforcement in Wisconsin have reported seeing blue, pink, orange and brown meth.

HOW IS METH USED?

Meth is taken orally, smoked, snorted or can be dissolved in water or alcohol and injected intravenous. Smoking and injecting the drug are the quickest ways to access the brain. Meth can affect the brain significantly by increasing levels of dopamine, which can lead to addiction. Meth can affect thinking, motor skills and cause memory loss. Frequently, meth is used with other substances including alcohol, cocaine, marijuana and heroin.

Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation – Milwaukee Field Division – Field Intelligence Group, Southeast Wisconsin Threat Analysis Center, & Wisconsin Statewide Intelligence Center. (2016). 2016 Wisconsin Methamphetamine Study.

Crystal Meth

Crystal Meth

Meth Powder

Meth Powder

 

DID YOU KNOW?

  1. Meth is a Schedule II controlled substance and has a high potential for abuse.
  2. Since 2011, the availability of meth in Wisconsin has increased drastically between 250-300%.
  3. Possession of meth or a controlled substance analog of meth is a Class I felony punishable by a prison term of up to 3 years and 6 months and/or a fine up to $10,000.
  4. From 2010-2014, grams of meth seized increased an alarming 1,592%. Most cases originated in northwestern Wisconsin.
  1. US Department of Justice – Drug Enforcement Administration. (2017). Drugs of Abuse.
  2. Federal Bureau of Investigation – Milwaukee Field Division – Field Intelligence Group, Southeast Wisconsin Threat Analysis Center, & Wisconsin Statewide Intelligence Center. (2016). 2016 Wisconsin Methamphetamine Study.
  3. Wisconsin State Legislature. Statutes (§ 961.41 and § 939.50).
  4. Federal Bureau of Investigation – Milwaukee Field Division – Field Intelligence Group, Southeast Wisconsin Threat Analysis Center, & Wisconsin Statewide Intelligence Center. (2016). 2016 Wisconsin Methamphetamine Study
Map of Meth Use in Wisconsin

METH CASES ANALYZED

Meth cases analyzed by the Wisconsin State Crime Laboratories has increased nearly 500% from 302 cases in 2010 to 1,696 cases in 2017.

Source: Wisconsin Department of Justice. (2017). Methamphetamine Cases by County of Offense.

“Meth is notorious for not only destroying the user, but the entire family and community around each user. We must work together to stop this horrible drug.”

– Wisconsin Attorney General Brad Schimel

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF METH USE

IMMEDIATE SYMPTOMS

  • Agitation
  • Chest pain
  • Dilated pupils
  • Elevated body temperature and heavy sweating
  • Excited speech
  • High blood pressure
  • Hyperactivity
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea, vomiting, and/or diarrhea
  • Shortness of breath

LONG-TERM EFFECTS

  • Anxiety
  • Changes in brain function and structure
  • Confusion
  • Decrease in thinking and motor skills
  • Hallucinations and delusions
  • Insomnia
  • Memory loss
  • Meth mouth (severe tooth decay)
  • Mood disturbances
  • Paranoia
  • Skin sores
  • Violent behavior
  • Weight loss

ADDITIONAL SIGNS

  • Hidden compartments in clothing or household items
  • Unexplained financial problems
  • Social isolation

PEOPLE WHO USE METH MIGHT HAVE:

  • Aluminum foil
  • Cut straws
  • Empty ink pens
  • Glass pipes (used pipes may have a waxy, yellowish or white residue)
  • Light bulbs with filament removed
  • Syringes
  • Small plastic bags and bag corners